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RA-RC261
Emergency and First Aid, Epidemiology, Home Care, Hypercalcemia, Massage, Second Opinions, Statistics
Alexandra Andrews



RA407 - Public aspects of medicine and health
including Epidemiology and Statistics


RA644-645 - Supportive Home Care

RB127-150 Physical Approaches to Pain Relief
RC82 - Second Opinions
RC86.7 - Emergency and First Aid Care

RC261 - Hypercalcemia


RA407 - Public Aspects of disease and health including Epidemiology and Statistics
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RA407.M159.1 - Epidemiology Introduction
M.J. McKeown, MD, FACOG, FACS
Epidemiology involves studying the distribution and determinants of the frequency of disease in a population
http://cancersupportivecare.com/epidemiology.html
First appeared 2006-10-22;
RA407.M159.2 - Statistics: A Tool, A Puzzle, A Diversion - Part 1
M. J. McKeown, MD, FACOG, FACS
At times there seems to be more than one true and correct answer. Here is where the use of this Statistical Analysis becomes needed, real and trusted. This means that the analysis system and its rules need to produce an answer that can be defined as near to absolute truth as possible and one that we can trust to guide us in our life decisions
http://cancersupportivecare.com/statistics1.html
First appeared 2006-10-22;
RA407.M159.3 - Statistics: A Tool, A Puzzle, A Diversion - Part 2
M. J. McKeown, MD, FACOG, FACS
Given suitable data it should be possible to calculate sensitivity and specificity. If the sensitivity, specificity and prevalence of a condition are known it should be possible to calculate positive and negative predictive values. It is necessary to understand these parameters of a test to decide the clinical applicability and usefulness
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/statistics2.html
First appeared 2006-10-22;

RA644-645 - Supportive Home Care
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RA644.R39.1 - Prevention of Infections For Caregivers and Patients
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD
Hand washing is the gold standard, and anything less is considered inadequate to help prevent patients from acquiring dangerous and possibly lethal transmitted infections.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/prevent.html
First appeared 2006-05-07
RA645.3.R39.1 - Before Hospital Discharge -- Evaluating Your Homecare Needs
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA, Diane Craig, RN, ONC, BSHS, and Carol S. Viele, RN, MS
Discharge from the hospital represents a crucial move and a progressive step in your rehabilitation. Many patients become more alert and better oriented after returning home. You will need to participate in planning your home care by providing information regarding the physical setup at your home - stairs, bathroom facilities - the availability of people to help you and whether special equipment can be accomodated.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/discharge.html
First appeared 2008-06-26
RA645.3.R39.2 - Going Home from the Hospital
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Irene Harrison, LCSW, Joan Keane, BSN, Barbara Penney, PHN, MS, and Harold Brownstein, MD
Going home from the hospital is an emotional experience. Illness touches off old thoughts, feelings and fears and creates disruptions. Planning ahead can improve the quality of life at home, reduce fear, and enhance the confidence of families, friends, and patients. Those who are most involved in their hospital plan of care will make the easiest transition to home care.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/homecare.html
First appeared 2008-11-17

Manifestations of disease - Massage, Physical Approaches to Pain Relief
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RB127.D58.1 - Massage for Supportive Cancer Care
Kathleen Dzubur, MS; Francine Manuel, RPT; Gary Abrams, MD; Lee Erman, NCTMB; Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
One of the most soothing treatments for a bedridden person is massage. In Europe and elsewhere, it is used frequently to promote relaxation, decrease pain and speed healing. It may also help reduce or eliminate the need for certain medications.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/massage.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-07
RB127.M41.1 - Physical Medicine Approaches To Pain Relief
Francine Manuel, RPT, Isadora Rosenbaum, MA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
The first step in reducing pain is to evaluate the cause and source of pain. Once it has been established through appropriate diagnostics that surgical intervention, radiation therapy or other treatments will not help, one needs to know if the pain comes from movement, lack of movement, position of limbs, position of the entire body or muscle tension. There are several effective techniques for pain control which do not require advanced technology
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/relief.html
First appeared 2002-02-21 updated 2012-05-01
RB127.M41.2 - Breathing and Exercise For Pain Relief
Francine Manuel, RPT, Isadora Rosenbaum, MA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Exercise and Breathing can help reduce pain. Improving range of motion, preventing stiff joints, muscle tension, lack of movement, and bedsores brings relief.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/painexercise.html
First appeared 2002-02-21 updated 2012-05-01
RB127.M41.3 - Massage For Pain Relief
Francine Manuel, RPT, Isadora Rosenbaum, MA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Massage can help reduce pain locally and achieve overall relaxation. A comfortable position at the start is very important. Four basic massage strokes - Effleurage-light and deep stroking, Petrisage-kneading, Tapotement-hacking or slapping, Friction-working with the fingertips.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/painmassage.html
First appeared 2002-02-21 updated 2012-05-01
RB127.M41.4 - Relaxation Exercises For Pain Relief
Francine Manuel, RPT, Isadora Rosenbaum, MA, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Body relaxation techniques can be effective in pain control because they teach the patient how to reduce muscular tension. The body's natural response to pain is to contract the muscles. This contraction intensifies the pain cycles and increases lactic acid accumulation. By getting the patient to relax the muscles, he or she can experience some relief from pain.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/painrelax.html
First appeared 2002-02-21 updated 2012-05-01

RC82 - Second Opinions
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RC82.R39.1 - Cancer Second Opinions
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Malin Dollinger, MD, Richard and Annette Bloch
None of us are prepared to be told we have cancer. It's like a membership in a new club, one we didn't know existed, didn't apply for, and don't want to belong to. Everyone seems to treat us differently. All of our old priorities and life suddenly change.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/secondopinions.html
First appeared 2000-05-19; updated 2007-07-15; reviewed 2011-08-15

RC86.7 - Emergency and First Aid Care
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RC86.7.R39.1 - How to Deal with Emergencies at Home
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Herman Uhley, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA and Becky Moore, RN
Prior planning, with your social worker, geriatric care manager, or doctor will make your life at home comfortable and safe. Keep emergency telephone numbers handy. Appropriate action while help is on the way may save a life. Common emergencies are - Cardio Pulmonary (CPR), Choking, Breathing, Bleeding, Broken Bones or Falls, Pulse Rate. Take a first aid course.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/emergency.html
First appeared 2008-06-19; updated 2008-06-26
RC86.7.R39.2 - Home Care Emergency and First Aid
Ernest H Rosenbaum, MD, Herman Uhley, MD, Isadora R. Rosenbaum, MA and Becky Moore, RN
Emergency First Aid - How to Administer CPR, How to Administer the Heimlich Maneuver for Choking, Shortness of Breath and Difficulty Breathing, Severe Bleeding, Broken Bones or Falls
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/firstaid.html
First appeared 2008-06-19; updated 2008-06-26

RC261 - Hypercalcemia
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RC261.S56.1 - Elevated blood calcium level-Hypercalcemia
Julie Schwenka, PharmD, UCSF
Hypercalcemia (high levels of calcium in your blood) is the most common life threatening disorder that is associated with cancer. It occurs in 10 to 20% of cancer patients.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/hypercalcemia.html
First appeared 2003-08-03; updated 2008-01-31


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First appeared July 23, 2007, updated May 1, 2012