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RC300-500
Neuropathy, Neurology, Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome, Sleep Disorders, Strokes, Tobacco and Smoking Cessation and more
Cancer Supportive Care Team

RC347 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome
RC358.5 - Strokes
RC409 - Neurology, Neuropathy,
RC547 - Sleep Disorders
RC567 - Tobacco and Smoking Cessation


RC347 Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome
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RC347.A8.1 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome: The Patient's Perspective
Alexandra Andrews, WM, David Bradley, Eileen Pichersky, BA
It is estimated that between 10% and 30% of patients will suffer persistent pain after breast surgery... it seems to be a more common occurrence in axillary dissections or total mastectomies than in breast-conserving surgeries
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/mastectomypain.php
First appeared 2002-03-01; updated 2007-10-31
RC347.M41.1 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome: The Physical Therapist's Perspective
Francine Manuel, RPT and Gerald Hirschberg, MD
Early restoration of range of motion to the shoulder is important to prevent a frozen shoulder or shoulder/hand syndrome. These two entities can cause pain separate from the neurogenic syndromes resulting from invasive node dissections. Physical therapy modalities can be used in conjunction with medications to help alleviate post breast surgery pain syndrome.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/physicalpain.php
First appeared 2002-10-19; updated 2007-10-31
RC347.R57.1 - Talking to Your Medical Team About Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS)
Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS
Recognition of Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) by the medical profession is still in its early stages. PBTBS is best treated as soon as possible, because it becomes chronic and more resistant to effective treatment when diagnosis and initiation of therapy is delayed. Many doctors are unaware of this problem because they have little experience in making the diagnosis, and in treating this syndrome. You may, therefore, need to take a somewhat proactive approach to educate your doctor or healthcare team about this problem, and to seek effective solutions from them.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/paintalk.php
First appeared 2003-03-02; updated 2007-09-01
RC347.S95.1 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS)
Sabrina Selim, MD, Richard Shapiro MD, E. Shelley Hwang, MD and Ernest Rosenbaum, MD
Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) depends on the characteristics, duration and location of pain. It is defined as typical neuropathic pain and associated symptoms numbness, dysesthesia, edema, allodynia located in the chest wall, axilla, arm, or shoulder of the surgical side, and persists beyond the typical 3 month healing period.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/neuropathicpain.php
First appeared 2002-06-01; updated 2007-10-31
RC347.W90.1 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome Information Handouts
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Charles M. Dollbaum,MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) remains an underreported-yet often debilitating-consequence of breast cancer therapy. Because PBTPS is not well understood by many physicians, breast cancer patients are often not advised about this risk prior to surgery, or the risk may be otherwise minimized. Subsequently, many patients unexpectedly experience chronic pain and other serious sensory disturbances that detract from their quality of life.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pbtpsinfo.html
First appeared 2003-03-06; updated 2006-12-31
RC347.W90.2 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome Information Handout Page 1
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Charles M. Dollbaum,MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Page 1 of Handout about Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) in pdf
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pbtpspage1.pdf
First appeared 2003-03-06; updated 2007-04-02
RC347.W90.3 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome Information Handout Page 2
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Charles M. Dollbaum,MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Page 2 of Handout about Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) in pdf
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pbtpspage2.pdf
First appeared 2003-03-06; updated 2006-10-03
RC347.W90.4 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome Information Handout
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome remains an underreported-yet often debilitating-consequence of breast cancer therapy. PBTPS is not well understood by many physicians and breast cancer patients are often not advised about this risk prior to surgery, or the risk may be otherwise minimized.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pbtpshandout.php
First appeared 2005-02-15; updated 2007-10-31
RC347.W90.5 - Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome: A Surgeon's Perspective
Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS
Additional factors linked to breast cancer-associated chronic pain syndromes include polyneuropathies caused by chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which may be additive to impairments caused by surgery
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/surgerypain.php
First appeared 2002-04-10 updated 2007-10-31
RC347.W90.6 - Post-Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome and Lymphedema: A Web-based Approach to Patient & Physician Education on www.cancersupportivecare.com
Joint Women's Health-Breast Oncology Program Scientific Retreat on Early Detection and Interventions in Breast, Ovarian, and Cervical Cancers Poster Session 5:00-7:00 pm, Thursday, March 13, 2003

Robert A. Wascher, MD, FACS, Charles Dollbaum, MD, PhD, Alexandra Andrews, Richard Shapiro, MD, E. Shelley Hwang,MD, Jean Chan, Francine Manuel, RPT, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome (PBTPS) remains an underreported-yet often debilitating-consequence of breast cancer therapy. PBTPS is estimated to affect 10 to 30% of women who have had breast cancer surgery. Because PBTPS is not well understood by many physicians, breast cancer patients are often not advised about this risk prior to surgery, or the risk may be otherwise minimized. Subsequently, many patients unexpectedly experience chronic pain and other serious sensory disturbances that detract from their quality of life. In post-surgery follow-up visits, patients may describe some early postoperative pain, but often PBTPS does not manifest as an ongoing chronic problem until at least 30-90 days afterwards.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/ucsf2003.html
First appeared 2003-12-17 updated 2007-02-18
RC347.W90.7 - Complications of breast cancer therapy, lymphedema and PBTPS
Abstract F-21 for the American Society of Breast Disease 31st Annual Symposium Society of Clinical Oncology, April 12-14, 2007, San Francisco, CA

Robert Wascher, MD1, Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD2, Alexandra Andrews2, David Spiegel, MD2, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD3
1Division of Surgical Oncology, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, NJ 07112, 2CancerSupportiveCare.com, Website, Stanford Hospitals and Clinics, Palo Alto, CA, United States, 94304 and 3Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States, 94115
Complications of breast cancer therapy, and lymphedema and PBTPS in particular, can result in a significantly adverse impact on quality of life (QOL) for millions of breast cancer patients.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/asbdpbtps.html
First appeared 2007-07-02
RC347.W90.8 - Discuss Post Breast Therapy Pain Syndrome Information
Robert Wascher, MD, FACS, Ernest Rosenbaum, MD, Alexandra Andrews, WM, Charles M. Dollbaum, MD, PhD, Karen Ritchie, MD, Sarah Schorr, RN, BSN, Francine Manuel, RPT, Jean Chan, BA, MA, SEd, Richard Shapiro, MD
Suggestions for discussing Breast cancer therapy complications, lymphedema and PBTPS, with your health care team.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/pbtpstalk.html
First appeared 2005-02-15; updated 2012-09-03

RC358.5 Stroke
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RC358.5.L185.1 - Stroke
Jay S. Luxenberg, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
A stroke is a highly treatable disease like a heart attack, but one must immediately get to a stroke center or hospital for early treatment. Due to delays, many are left with major physical debilities that totally change their lives. Signs of a stroke are sudden onset of dizziness, unsteadiness, a sudden fall, visual dimness, difficulty speaking or understanding speech, numbness, weakness in face, arms, legs
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/stroke.html
First appeared 2008-01-15; updated 2008-08-02
RC358.5.L185.2 - Strokes
Jay S. Luxenberg, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Strokes are characterized by a sudden onset of a focal neurological deficit with a stepwise gradual progression of symptoms, including vision loss, speech loss, weakness, unstable balance, sensory loss, and sometimes, loss of consciousness.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivorship/strokes.html
First appeared 2009-09-27;

RC409 Neurology. Neuropathy
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RC409.N4.1 - Neuropathy from Chemotherapy
Zoe Ngo, PharmD
Chemotherapy can have adverse effects on the nervous system. Some chemotherapy such as vincristine, cisplatin, and paclitaxel have been known to cause symptoms of neuropathy such as numbness, tingling and pain in the extremities, mild weakness, and constipation. Severe nerve damage may cause impaired walking abilities, severe bladder dysfunction, and disabling sensory loss. These side effects may improve or disappear after the discontinuation of chemotherapy
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/neuropathy.html
First appeared 2003-08-10 updated 2007-11-08
RC409.W149.1 - Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy - CPIN Fact Sheet
Meredith A. Wampler, PT, DPTSc and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CPIN) describes damage to the peripheral nervous system and the rest of the body, caused by some chemotherapy agents. Commonly used chemotherapy agents associated with peripheral neuropathy are listed
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nervepain.php
First appeared 2005-10-28; updated 2008-04-02
RC409.W149.2 - Chemotherapy-induced Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet- References
Meredith A. Wampler, PT, DPTSc and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
References for Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Commonly used chemotherapy agents associated with peripheral neuropathy are listed
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/nervepainref.html
First appeared 2005-10-28; updated 2007-07-18

RC547 Sleep Disorders
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RC547.C27.1 - Sleep Disorders and Management
David Claman, MD
Sleep is a basic human need, which is as important for good health as diet and exercise. Getting an adequate amount of good quality sleep is vital for alert mental functioning during the daytime.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/sleep_disorders.html
First appeared 1999-05-01; updated 2007-11-07
RC547.C27.2 - The Role of Sleep in Health, Disease, and Therapy
David Claman, MD and Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Cancer survivors have many potential physical and psychological issues which may disturb sleep. Four main categories of insomnia are medical causes, psychiatric, situational and pharmacologic. Survivors may be waking up because of shortness of breath from lung problems, ulcer pain, chronic arthritis in the hips or knees or hands, prescription drug side effects, anxiety or depression.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/sleep.html
First appeared 2007-12-14; updated 2008-08-02

RC567 Tobacco and Smoking Cessation
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RC567.R39.1 - An Approach to Stopping Smoking
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Stopping smoking becomes a vital part of therapy and survival programs. Those who smoke may have increased side effects complicating chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgical recovery. A therapeutic tobacco intervention program makes a difference.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/smoke.html
First appeared 2007-07-11; updated 2009-07-12
RC567.R39.2 - Tobacco and Cancer
Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD
Tobacco use is one of the leading causes of death in America causally related to lung, bladder, head and neck, cervix, kidney, and esophagus cancer, cardiovascular disease, stroke, emphysema, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking is a tough addiction to break because of physiological and a psychological dependence on nicotine.
http://www.cancersupportivecare.com/Survivor/tobacco.html
First appeared 2007-12-09; updated 2009-07-12


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First appeared January 15, 2008; updated September 2, 2012